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Thursday, June 18, 2015

Handbook of Flotation Reagents: Chemistry, Theory and Practice

      Handbook of Flotation Reagents: Chemistry, Theory and Practice is a condensed form of the fundamental knowledge of chemical reagents commonly used in flotation and is addressed to the researchers and plant metallurgists who employ these reagents. This book consists of three distinct parts: part 1 provides detailed description of the chemistry used in mineral processing industry; part 2 describes theoretical aspects of the action of flotation reagents, while part 3 provides information on the use of reagents in over 100 operating plants treating Cu, Cu/Zn, Cu/Pb, Zn, Pb/Zn/Ag, Cu/Ni and Ni ores.

    Looks at the theoretical aspects of flotation reagents
    Examines the practical aspects of using chemical reagents in operating plants
    Provides guidelines for researchers and engineers involved in process design and development

       Provides a valuable tool for mineral technologists and metallurgical engineers working in mineral separation plants, researchers in mineral processing and university students.Handbook of Flotation Reagents: Chemistry, Theory and Practice provides a condensed form of the fundamental knowledge of chemical reagents commonly used in flotation addressing the researchers and plant metallurgists who employ these reagents. This series of books consists of three distinct parts: Volume 1 provides detailed description of the surface and colloid chemistry principles involved in the mineral processing industry and the flotation of sulphide minerals; Volume 2 describes the flotation of Gold, PGM and oxide minerals, while Volume 3 provides information on the use of reagents in over 100 operating plants treating industrial and oxidic minerals. Written in a clear, easy-to-follow format and including multiple instances of data from innovative technology, Handbook of Flotation Reagents: Chemistry, Theory and Practice is an indispensable reference for any professional working with flotation reagents.

Froth Flotation: A Century of Innovation

    Froth flotation is a process for selectively separating hydrophobic materials from hydrophilic. This is used in several processing industries. Historically this was first used in the mining industry, where it was one of the great enabling technologies of the 20th century. It has been described as "the single most important operation used for the recovery and upgrading of sulfide ores".The development of froth flotation improved the recovery of valuable minerals, such as copper- and lead-bearing minerals. Along with mechanized mining, it allowed the economic recovery of valuable metals from much lower grade ore than before.
   Before froth flotation can work, the ore to be treated is reduced to fine particles by crushing and grinding (a process known as comminution) so that the various minerals exist as physically separate grains. This process is known as liberation. The particle sizes are typically less than 0.1 mm (100 µm), but sometimes sizes smaller than 7–10 µm are required. There is a tendency for the liberation size of the minerals to decrease over time as the ore bodies with coarse mineral grains that can be separated at larger sizes are depleted and replaced by ore bodies that were formerly considered too difficult.

In the mining industry, the plants where flotation is undertaken to concentrate ore are generally known as concentrators or mills.

For froth flotation, the ground ore is mixed with water to form a slurry and the desired mineral is rendered hydrophobic by the addition of a surfactant or collector chemical (although some mineral surfaces are naturally hydrophobic, requiring little or no addition of collector). The particular chemical depends on the nature of the mineral to be recovered and, perhaps, the natures of those that are not wanted. As an example, sodium ethyl xanthate ("SEX") may be added as a collector in the selective flotation of galena (lead sulfide) to separate it from sphalerite (zinc sulfide). This slurry (more properly called the pulp) of hydrophobic particles and hydrophilic particles is then introduced to tanks known as flotation cells that are aerated to produce bubbles. The hydrophobic particles attach to the air bubbles, which rise to the surface, forming a froth. The froth is removed from the cell, producing a concentrate ("con") of the target mineral.

Frothing agents, known as frothers, may be introduced to the pulp to promote the formation of a stable froth on top of the flotation cell.

The minerals that do not float into the froth are referred to as the flotation tailings or flotation tails. These tailings may also be subjected to further stages of flotation to recover the valuable particles that did not float the first time. This is known as scavenging. The final tailings after scavenging are normally pumped for disposal as mine fill or to tailings disposal facilities for long-term storage.

Froth flotation efficiency is determined by a series of probabilities: those of particle–bubble contact, particle–bubble attachment, transport between the pulp and the froth, and froth collection into the product launder. In a conventional mechanically-agitated cell, the void fraction (i.e. volume occupied by air bubbles) is low (5 to 10 percent) and the bubble size is usually greater than 1 mm. This results in a relatively low interfacial area and a low probability of particle–bubble contact. Consequently, several cells in series are required to increase the particle residence time, thus increasing the probability of particle–bubble contact.

Flotation is normally undertaken in several stages to maximize the recovery of the target mineral or minerals and the concentration of those minerals in the concentrate, while minimizing the energy input.